Dumfries & Galloway...

enjoying the best of landscapes, beaces, forests and rolling hills...
One of the most beautiful and contrasting areas of Scotland – and one of the most accessible, yet one of the least explored – a bit of an enigma. The region encapsulates all that is best about Scotland; acres of sky, miles of rugged coastline, sandy beaches, mysterious forests, rolling hills, tranquil lochs, fresh local produce and authentic traditions stretching back into the past - so why go any further or by-pass it? Being able to enjoy the natural landscape is one of the things people like most about Dumfries & Galloway. There is a large array of options for groups from active recreation on the land, rivers, lochs and sea to sightseeing, shopping, enjoying the local culture and traditions or discovering the local wildlife whilst walking, cycling or visiting one of the 30 specialist gardens. Dumfries is the largest town and the major shopping centre situated on the River Nith, with its resident salmon and sea trout. The town is closely associated with Robert Burns. In Gretna Green stories are told of the many thousands of young lovers who had to run away north to Scotland to get married - during the halcyon days of parental control! Further north on the A74, in the hills, lies the busy little market town of Moffat which became fashionable following the discovery of mineral springs - annual walking festival each October.

Castle Douglas, on the Solway Coast, is one of three 'theme towns' – the Castle Douglas “Food Town” – named appropriately for the abundant fresh local produce to be found in the restaurants and hotels and the plethora of traditional food shops. Kirkcudbright, the "Artists Town", has a long history as a haven for artists and craftsmen. Wigtown is Scotland's original “National Book Town” and the annual book Festival in September draws some of the biggest names in literature and there are regular smaller events throughout the year. Stranraer is a major ferry port to Northern Ireland. Newton Stewart rests on the edge of the huge Galloway Forest Park. The town itself contains some very pleasant walks especially in the RSPB reserve at the Wood of Cree, the most ancient native woodland in the South of Scotland.