Argyll, the Isles, Loch Lomond, Stirling and the Trossachs...

with landscapes as diverse as Scotland itself...
As diverse an area as you are ever likely to encounter in Scotland as it combines the Nationally significant heritage of Stirling and Bannockburn together with the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park and the scenic beauty of mountains, islands and seascape for which Scotland is renowned. This is where the Lowlands meet the West Highlands - and islands such as Bute, Jura, Islay, Mull, Coll, Tiree and the holy Isle of Iona with landscapes and seascapes, mountains, breathtaking island beaches, heritage and history in every scene. An area easily accessible - even the islands - making it one of the most popular destinations in the UK. History and heritage is strong here, from pre-history sites in Kintyre and Islay to early Christian settlements centred on Iona, to this day still a beautiful and peaceful island. Scotland's fight for independence is encompassed here in three sites - Stirling Castle, Bannockburn, and the Wallace Monument, all of which have significant place in the Nation's history. The Trossachs is where Rob Roy McGregor was brought up and cruises on Loch Katrine take the visitor near to his birthplace at Glengyle. Oban, has been a major port to the islands for centuries, giving the harbour a natural "busy" appearance.

The gardens of Argyll from Taynuilt to Dunoon and Bute are a horticulturalist's paradise ranging from the unusually lime-rich soils of the Isle of Lismore to the more common peaty soils of the mainland. With Glasgow not so far away, Loch Lomond has always been a magnet for visitors. National Park status was gained in 2002 and the National Park Gateway Centre, together with the Loch Lomond Shores complex at Balloch offers visitors the opportunity to learn more about this National treasure as well giving the opportunity to explore or take part in many water-sports on the Loch. As with most of this area of contrast and scenic beauty, the opportunities to take walks in the countryside is vast. No more so than in the Cowal Peninsula and the Isle of Bute - from forest walks to beaches and coastal paths - all as diverse as the area itself.